Adverse health teen dating violence

01 Nov

The authors assessed physical and psychological dating violence victimization reported at Wave 2.

The authors analyzed data by using multivariate linear and logistic regression models.

Findings from this study emphasize the importance of screening and offering secondary prevention programs to both male and female victims.

The authors' objective in this study was to determine the longitudinal association between teen dating violence victimization and selected adverse health outcomes.

During the second follow-up, participants were assessed for adverse health outcomes, including: Results were stratified by gender and adjusted for race, age, socioeconomic status, child maltreatment, pubertal status, and gender.

Author(s): Deinera Exner-Cortens, MPH, John Eckenrode, Ph D, and Emily Rothman, Sc D Published: December 10th, 2012 Report Intro/Brief: "OBJECTIVE: To determine the longitudinal association between teen dating violence victimization and selected adverse health outcomes.

In particular, it is a problem that we need to address through early education, prevention and intervention.

““The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends that pediatricians start this discussion with their early adolescent patients.

The authors' analysis of the results suggest that dating violence experienced during adolescence is related to adverse health outcomes in young adulthood.RESULTS: Compared with participants reporting no teen dating violence victimization at Wave 2, female participants experiencing victimization reported increased heavy episodic drinking, depressive symptomatology, suicidal ideation, smoking, and IPV victimization at Wave 3, whereas male participants experiencing victimization reported increased antisocial behaviors, suicidal ideation, marijuana use, and IPV victimization at Wave 3, controlling for sociodemographics, child maltreatment, and pubertal status.CONCLUSIONS: The results from the present analyses suggest that dating violence experienced during adolescence is related to adverse health outcomes in young adulthood.Compared to adolescents reporting no dating violence, teen girls who were victimized by a boyfriend were more likely to engage in smoking and heavy drinking, and to experience symptoms of depression and thoughts of suicide five years later.Teen boys victimized by a girlfriend reported increased anti-social behaviors and suicidal thoughts, and were more likely to use marijuana five years later.​​The information below is meant only as a starting place for pediatric medical home teams to begin addressing teen dating violence. Teens subjected to psychological and physical violence in their relationships may be at higher risk for adverse health outcomes in young adulthood, researchers found.Dating violence in adolescence was also associated with re-victimization in young adulthood, potentially because unhealthy experiences skew an adolescent’s understanding of what a healthy relationship looks like.This study adds to evidence showing that dating violence is an extremely important public health problem that needs more attention.Outcome measures were reported at Wave 3, and included depressive symptomatology, self-esteem, antisocial behaviors, sexual risk behaviors, extreme weight control behaviors, suicidal ideation and attempt, substance use (smoking, heavy episodic drinking, marijuana, other drugs), and adult intimate partner violence (IPV) victimization.Data were analyzed by using multivariate linear and logistic regression models.